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  • Writer's picturePekaj Group Pty Ltd.

Estimating vs Quantity Surveying

Updated: Jan 20

Introduction

Estimating and Quantity Surveying are two distinct but closely related functions in the construction industry. While both deal with the costs and quantities of materials, labour, and equipment required for a construction project, they each have a unique focus and objective.


Estimating

Estimating is a crucial step in the planning process for construction projects as it helps to determine the feasibility of a project and the budget required to complete it. The accuracy of an estimate can have significant financial implications for both the client and the contractor, so it is important to have experienced professionals with in-depth knowledge of the construction industry to carry out the estimating process.


  • Determine the budget required to complete a construction project.

  • Evaluate the feasibility of a project.

  • Provide a basis for decision making by the client or contractor.

  • Plan and organize resources required to complete a project.

  • Negotiate contracts between the client, contractor, and suppliers.

Quantity Surveying

Quantity surveying is a specialised function within the construction industry that has been around for hundreds of years, but it wasn't until 1868 that the term "quantity surveyor" was coined by Sir Alfred Jones.


Quantity surveyors are responsible for determining the quantities of materials required for a project, as well as their costs, and for preparing and negotiating the contracts between the client, the contractor and the suppliers.


The role of a quantity surveyor in the building industry is to ensure that construction projects are completed within budget and to the highest possible standards. They work closely with architects, engineers and contractors to ensure that the costs and quantities of materials, labour and equipment are accurately calculated and that the project budget is realistic and achievable.


Quantity surveying used in the construction industry to:

  • Determine the quantities and costs of materials, labour and equipment required for a construction project.

  • Prepare and negotiate contracts between the client, contractor, and suppliers.

  • Provide cost control and cost management services.

  • Monitor and report on the financial status of a construction project.

  • Provide advice on contractual matters, disputes, and claims resolution.

Estimating and Quantity Surveying are both important functions in the construction industry.

Estimating is the process of calculating the probable cost of a construction project, considering various factors such as materials, labour, equipment and contingencies. Quantities Surveyors use their knowledge of building science to ensure that all aspects of a building are designed correctly so that it performs as expected and meets regulations on safety and sustainability. They may also be involved with other types of projects such as roads or bridges, which require them to work closely with civil engineers who specialise in these areas.


The role of an estimating is quite different from that of a quantity surveyor: they provide estimates for projects that don't need specialist technical knowledge (for example small private extensions), whereas quantity surveyors focus on larger commercial developments such as office blocks or retail parks where there is more complexity involved because there's often more than one client involved who has differing requirements regarding things like energy efficiency standards etcetera."


Conclusion

Estimating and Quantity Surveying are both important functions in the construction industry. They have a lot of overlap, but there are also some key differences between them. Estimators use their knowledge of construction costs to provide estimates for projects while Quantity Surveyors use their expertise with measurement and analysis in order to ensure that those costs are accurate.

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